Newsletter Articles

Do you have a newsletter for your moms group/church or synagogue group/community group that can reach women with information about cervical cancer prevention? Below are articles you can run as-is, or adapt for your community:

Full article:

September is Gynecologic Cancer Awareness Month

Protect Yourself from Cervical Cancer:
Learn about Pap testing, HPV testing and HPV vaccines

More than 80,000 women in the US are diagnosed with a gynecologic cancer – cervical, ovarian, uterine, vaginal or vulvar – each year, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Worldwide, cervical cancer is the second most common cancer in women and more than 11,000 women are diagnosed with cervical cancer in the U.S. each year. Yet, cervical cancer is highly preventable because it’s the only cancer with a single known primary cause: human papillomavirus (HPV).

HPV is a very common virus: 80 percent of women are estimated to get HPV at some point in their lives. Most HPV infections go away on their own without any symptoms or requiring any treatment. However, infection with certain “high-risk” types of HPV may persist in some women, causing the cervix to produce abnormal cells that can eventually develop into cervical cancer.

Two decades ago, there was little understanding of the link between HPV and cervical cancer. Today, there is a growing arsenal of HPV-targeted approaches to preventing cervical cancer. While Pap testing looks for abnormal cervical cells, HPV screening, with newer tests like the digene HPV Test, identifies women with the “high-risk”, cancer-causing types HPV infections. HPV testing helps women learn their HPV status, and helps doctors and nurses identify, and keep a closer eye on, women who are at greatest risk for cervical disease - enabling monitoring and treatment to be put in place before cervical cancer can ever develop. For women age 30 and older, the Pap and HPV tests together provide the best screening protection against cervical cancer. For young girls, HPV vaccination can prevent future infections of the two most common cancer-causing HPV strains.

So what can you do to protect your cervix?

- Ages 9-26: Consider an HPV vaccine.
- Age 21 and older: Get a regular Pap test.
- Age 30 and older: Ask for an HPV test together with your Pap test.

Take advantage of Gynecologic Cancer Awareness Month this September: Get educated about prevention, keep up with your regular well-woman exams, and speak to your healthcare provider about the best cervical cancer protection tools for you. Learn more at www.theHPVtest.com, www.cdc.gov/cancer/cervical or www.healthywomen.org/condition/cervical-cancer.

Cervical cancer starts with a virus.

Did you know it can be detected with a test?

September is Gynecologic Cancer Awareness Month. Did you know cervical cancer is the second most common cancer in women worldwide? Yet, cervical cancer is highly preventable because it’s the only cancer with a single known primary cause: human papillomavirus (HPV). Today, we have the tools to stop cervical cancer:

- Ages 9-26: Consider an HPV vaccine.
- Age 21 and older: Get a regular Pap test.
- Age 30 and older: Ask for an HPV test together with your Pap test.

Take advantage of Gynecologic Cancer Awareness Month this September: Get educated about prevention, keep up with your regular well-woman exams, and speak to your healthcare provider about HPV testing and the right cervical cancer protection tools for you. Learn more about cervical cancer and HPV at www.theHPVtest.com. Learn more about Gynecologic Cancer Month and download factsheets and toolkits at http://www.wcn.org/downloads/GCAM-toolkit.pdf.